Human rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948, partly in response to the atrocities of World War II.

Human rights are basic or fundamental inalienable rights and freedoms that all people are entitled to regardless of nationality, sex, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, language, or other status . The Universal Declaration of Human Rights establish the civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights of all people.

Some examples of human rights include:
  • The right to life.
  • The right to liberty and freedom.
  • The right to the pursuit of happiness.
  • The right to live your life free of discrimination.
  • The right to control what happens to your own body and to make medical decisions for yourself

Examples of human rights also include:

  • The right to control what happens to your own body and to make medical decisions for yourself
  • The right to freely exercise your religion and practice your religious beliefs without fear of being prosecuted for your beliefs
  • The right to be free from prejudice on the basis of race, gender, national origin, color, age or sex
  • The right to grow old
  • The right to a fair trial and due process of the law
  • The right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment
  • The right to be free from torture
  • The right to be free from slavery
  • The right to freedom of speech
  • The right to freely associate with whomever you like and to join groups of which you’d like to be a part.
  • The right to freedom of thought
  • The right not to be prosecuted from your thoughts

Government programs such as  society security,  medicare and food stamps that purport to protect the poor also are based on the idea that people have the basic right not to live in poverty, to have enough to eat and to grow old gracefully. While these programs may be more controversial, most people accept these rights as part of the social safety net even there is disagreement on how best to facilitate programs that guarantee these rights.

Different societies have different ideas on what fundamental human rights are and the government protections extended to protect basic human rights are a reflection of the widespread cultures and ideals of the society as a whole.

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